Creative Arts as a Career highlights young Barbadians’ disinterest

A top entertainer in Barbados believes the hotel and restaurant industry thirty years ago was heavily discriminated.

Despite this ignorance, Grammy Nominated Nicholas Brancker used this adversity to eventually become self sufficient despite the added hardship of having family resistant to his musical aspirations. Nicholas was a main speaker at the opening ceremony for the National Services Week Education Event entitled, "The Business and Career Opportunities Available in the Arts," where secondary students were introduced to the idea that creative industries is a viable employment opportunity.

Despite this ignorance, Grammy Nominated Nicholas Brancker used this adversity to eventually become self sufficient despite the added hardship of having family resistant to his musical aspirations. Nicholas was a main speaker at the opening ceremony for the National Services Week Education Event entitled, “The Business and Career Opportunities Available in the Arts,” where secondary students were introduced to the idea that creative industries is a viable employment opportunity.

The co-founder of hotel circuit band “Second Avenue,” told the youngsters how he and his partners edged around prejudice and continued to earn money;-

Nicholas Brancker addressed teens from Queen’s College, Springer Memorial and Harrison College among other secondary institutions, in doing a pop quiz he learned only 2 members of the audience want to have music as a career…

Undaunted, the veteran entertainer explained to these youngsters how fame is not necessarily success, and cited saxophonist Arturo Tappin, steel pannist Roger Gittens and jazz sax virtuoso Andre Woodvine as fellow Bajans who chose music and this career fed their families and sent their children to college.

Undaunted, the veteran entertainer explained to these youngsters how fame is not necessarily success, and cited saxophonist Arturo Tappin, steel pannist Roger Gittens and jazz sax virtuoso Andre Woodvine as fellow Bajans who chose music and this career fed their families and sent their children to college.

The musician told the young participants that TV fame is not everything, and being friends or related to high-profile artistes does not mean you have a salary for life – only dedication, determination and discipline safeguards whatever their talents may be;-

Brancker, has collaborated with the likes of R&B icon Roberta Flack and Fritz McIntyre of “Simply Red” apart from producing many of the Caribbean’s biggest stars including Arrow, Edwin Yearwood, Allison Hinds, Rupee, TC, RPB and Glen Washington to name a few as well as his work featured in the soundtrack for the film “After The Sunset” with Pierce Brosnan and Salma Hayak.

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