Love won: Same-sex marriage now recognised as all other unions in USA

In a landmark opinion, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled 5-4 on Friday that all states cannot ban same-sex marriage, handing gay rights advocates their biggest victory yet.

The U.S. Supreme Court’s ruling on same-sex marriage is “a victory for America,” President Barack Obama said in the Rose Garden on the White House grounds.

The decision that states must allow same-sex marriages affirms a founding principle for the country “that all people are created equal,” Obama said.

This ruling will strengthen all of our communities by offering to all loving same-sex couples the dignity of marriage across this great land.”

Sir Ian McKellen, Ellen DeGeneres, George Takei, Anna Kendrick, and President Obama all react to the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage.

Sir Ian McKellen, Ellen DeGeneres, George Takei, Anna Kendrick, and President Obama all react to the Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage.

Earlier the President called Jim Obergefell, the lead plaintiff in the case before the Supreme Court, while he and his supporters celebrated the ruling outside the court.

“I just wanted to say congratulations,” Obama said as CNN broadcast his warm words to Obergefell over speaker phone. He added: “Your leadership on this has changed the country.”

Jim Obergefell is one of the plaintiffs in the case decided by the U.S. Supreme Court that held that, for the first time, any couple – straight, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender – can obtain a marriage license and make their commitment public and legal in all 50 states.

WhiteHouse.gov reached out to him to ask for his thoughts on this historic occasion, and this is the open letter he wanted us to share with you;-

My husband John died 20 months ago, so we’re unable to celebrate together the Supreme Court’s decision on the case that bears my name, Obergefell v. Hodges.

For the first time, any couple – straight, lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender – may obtain a marriage license and make their commitments public and legal in all 50 states. America has taken one more step toward the promise of equality enshrined in our Constitution, and I’m humbled to be part of that.

John and I started our fight for a simple reason: We wanted the State of Ohio to recognize our lawful Maryland marriage on John’s impending death certificate. We wanted respect and dignity for our 20-year relationship, and as he lay dying of ALS, John had the right to know his last official record as a person would be accurate. We wanted to live up to the promises we made to love, honor, and protect each other as a committed and lawfully married couple.

Couples across America may now wed and have their marriage recognized and respected no matter what state they call home. No other person will learn at the most painful moment of married life, the death of a spouse, that their lawful marriage will be disregarded by the state. No married couple who moves will suddenly become two single persons because their new state ignores their lawful marriage.

Ethan and Andrew can marry in Cincinnati instead of being forced to travel to another state.

A girl named Ruby can have an accurate birth certificate listing her parents Kelly and Kelly.

Pam and Nicole never again have to fear for Grayden and Orion’s lives in a medical emergency because, in their panic, they forgot legal documents that prove both mothers have the right to approve care.

Cooper can grow into a man knowing Joe and Rob are his parents in all ways emotional and legal.

I can finally relax knowing that Ohio can never erase our marriage from John’s death certificate, and my husband can now truly rest in peace.

Marriage is about promises and commitments made legal and binding under the law, and those laws must apply equally to each and every American.

Today is a momentous day in our history. It’s a day when the Supreme Court of the United States lived up to the words inscribed above the front entrance of the courthouse:

Equal Justice Under Law.

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