REGISTRATION OF CARIBBEAN MANAGEMENT CONSULTANTS COMING IN 2015: WHO MONITORS REGISTRANTS?

(EDITOR’s NOTE – In theory, this process of qualifying trained individuals may appear a good thing… But are those qualifying the applicants themselves trained and certified? A prime example is ask who is doing the Industrial Tribunal of NCC workers in Barbados waiting on severance – there are claims the adjudicator may have deep familial connections as far as Cabinet, can you say… Conflict of Interest? Strong’s Supreme Service has run afoul of a local Union at one of the newspapers here when their suggestion for answering calls was in contravention of policy regarding Receptionists and Reporters, so give and take with a generous dollop of Uncommon Sense must prevail in the end!)

Management Consultants practicing in the Caribbean will have the same registration and licensing requirements as other professional service providers from 2015. That word comes from the CARICOM Secretariat as local and regional Management Consults prepare to take part in a Management Consulting Training Workshop next week in Barbados.

“The region moves a step closer to the formation of a single space for professional services with the adoption of The CARICOM Regional Policy on the Provision of Professional Services in the CARICOM Single Market and Economy (CSME),” said Timothy Odle, CARICOM Secretariat Deputy Programme Manager of Services. “We have outlined the regional vision for the transparent and independent regulation of professionals; their single registration and licensing; how they are to be disciplined, and a common understanding and treatment of offences.”

The recognition of Management Consultancy as a profession was announced by Odle at the recently held annual meeting of the CICMC in Trinidad, and follows several years of consultations involving the Caribbean Institute of Management Consultants (CICMC), CARICOM and Caribbean Export, a major supporter of the recognition of the profession. Once in place, the Policy will mean that in order to practice as a Management Consultant in the region, professionals will be required to demonstrate a level of knowledge, experience and expertise commensurate with standards that have been accepted for the profession on a global level.

"For the first time CARICOM has recognised Management Consultancy as a profession with the need for its practitioners to meet globally recognised standards," said Dennis Strong, CMC, founder and past president of the Caribbean Institute of Certified Management Consultants (CICMC) while preparing for the upcoming Principles of Management Consultancy training workshop at the Barbados Hilton November 18 -20.

For the first time CARICOM has recognised Management Consultancy as a profession with the need for its practitioners to meet globally recognised standards,” said Dennis Strong, CMC, founder and past president of the Caribbean Institute of Certified Management Consultants (CICMC) while preparing for the upcoming Principles of Management Consultancy training workshop at the Barbados Hilton November 18 -20.

The policy framework to make registration and licensing of Management Consultants has been agreed upon by CARICOM, and work is now underway to formalise the legislative framework. Once the legislative framework is in place it must be approved by each country before taking affect. Discussions are now underway with the appropriate government agencies to make this historic recognition a reality.

“Recognition of the profession by CARICOM will have far-reaching benefits for both practitioners and the region,” Strong continued. “This step fulfils the requirements of the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) between CARIFORUM and the European Union (EU) for mutual recognition which will open the doors for Management Consultants based in the Caribbean to not only practice within the EU with full recognition, but also allow entities in the region to lessen the need to use Management Consultants from outside the Caribbean to meet their needs. This reduction in the use of foreign consultants will assist all of our countries in their drive to stem the outflow or foreign reserves.”

Recognition, once approved region-wide, will involve a two-step process. The first step will require Management Consultants to register their services with government, while the second step will involve licensing by an authority recognised by states for this purpose.

The establishment of the licensing authorities is one of the issues that will be discussed during the negotiation process with governments. The policy will also contain provisions for sanctions against those practicing as Management Consultants who are out of compliance.

While no timetable has been set for the implementation of the recognition process for Management Consultants, Strong says that CARICOM has pledged to accomplish this “before the end of 2015.

(REDUX – EDITOR’s NOTE: Can we assume this is an empty pledge, much like Barbados’ proposed Freedom of Expression or Freedom of Information legislation pledged ever since by the Freundel Stuart regime?)

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