U.S. Embassy Bridgetown Supports Return of Disabled Rights Activist

U.S. Embassy Bridgetown is pleased to support American disabled rights activist, Malia Johnson, as she visits Barbados this week during the International Week of the Deaf, September 21-28, 2014. Ms. Johnson will collaborate with the Barbados Council for the Deaf to host workshops for the deaf community, caregivers, and interpreters. Ms. Johnson will visit a number of schools which have annexes for deaf students, and she will also participate in various other activities planned for the week, including a meeting with the Ministry of Social Care, panel discussions, and a celebratory picnic.

Last year, through grant funding from U.S. Embassy Bridgetown, the Barbados Council for the Disabled hosted a productive public forum that featured American speaker, Malia Johnson.  This public forum highlighted the rights of both deaf and non-hearing impaired interpreters, discussed the pressing needs of the deaf community in Barbados, and facilitated discussions between the disabled community, governmental agencies, the private sector, and the police force.

Last year, through grant funding from U.S. Embassy Bridgetown, the Barbados Council for the Disabled hosted a productive public forum that featured American speaker, Malia Johnson. This public forum highlighted the rights of both deaf and non-hearing impaired interpreters, discussed the pressing needs of the deaf community in Barbados, and facilitated discussions between the disabled community, governmental agencies, the private sector, and the police force.

Ms. Johnson is the Chief Executive Officer of Deaf Talk LLC, a deaf-owned company based in Florida. The company offers sign language services, bridging the communication gap for disabled people and enhancing the quality of interaction between the deaf and hearing communities.

U.S. Embassy Bridgetown is pleased to support Ms. Johnson return to Barbados as her work underscores the Embassy’s ongoing commitment to the disabled community, which is a key component of our larger human rights agenda.

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