Barbadian businessman in NY, George “GANDHI” Whitehead found dead in Queens home

A prominent Caribbean businessman and civic leader in New York City was found dead in his home in Queens.

New York police officers say George “Gandhi” Whitehead may have died from a single gunshot wound.

It is not known what caused his unexpected and tragic death but police detectives are investigating all of the circumstances surrounding it,” said a relative. “It is possible that he could have been cleaning his gun and it accidentally discharged. Right now we really don’t know what happened. It is extremely difficult to come to grips with the tragedy. We must await the results of the autopsy to find out the exact cause of death.

{IMAGE VIA: city-data.com, DEMO ONLY} Whitehead owned and ran an automobile garage and audio store on Utica Avenue in Brooklyn for about 20 years and it had become a center of community activity in the neighborhood. Whitehead, who was in his sixties was involved in a range of civic and business activities in the City, including serving on the advisory board of a major medical center in central Brooklyn. He recently closed his business.

{IMAGE VIA: city-data.com, DEMO ONLY} Whitehead owned and ran an automobile garage and audio store on Utica Avenue in Brooklyn for about 20 years and it had become a center of community activity in the neighborhood. Whitehead, who was in his sixties was involved in a range of civic and business activities in the City, including serving on the advisory board of a major medical center in central Brooklyn. He recently closed his business.

Barbados Opposition Leader, Mia Mottley, who has known the Bajan for almost all of her life, described him as “family” and as a highly respected and well liked community oriented individual who routinely went out of his way to assist Barbadians and West Indians in need in the City.

"He knew New York City very well and people will remember him for his friendly manner and for his pioneering efforts in promoting Barbadian and Caribbean culture in the City, especially during the West Indian Labor Day and Crop Over festivals, " said Mottley. "He routinely extended a helping hand to people in need and often did so when he might not have been able to be so generous with people."

He knew New York City very well and people will remember him for his friendly manner and for his pioneering efforts in promoting Barbadian and Caribbean culture in the City, especially during the West Indian Labor Day and Crop Over festivals, ” said Mottley. “He routinely extended a helping hand to people in need and often did so when he might not have been able to be so generous with people.”

He organized a large Barbadian band in the West Indian carnival on Eastern Parkway in the 1990s early 2000s. The Barbadian, a father of two children, was the husband of Emily Whitehead and the couple lived in Ozone Park, a largely middleclass community in Queens. He was found dead during the weekend.

“He was a civic minded businessman who was very much involved in all phases of the Barbadian and West Indian community, especially our music and carnival,” said Jessica Odle-Baril, a former Barbados consul general in the City. “His unexpected death has come as a shock to all of us.”

Many of Brooklyn’s elected officials who are members of the New York City Council, the U.S. House of Representatives in Washington and the State legislature in Albany routinely sought Whitehead’s support. That was due to his popularity in Brooklyn and the central location of his business in the heart of the Caribbean immigrant and African American community. {DATA COURTESY: Caribbean Fever}

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