“Juvenescence” at Errol Barrow Centre for Creative Imagination ’til May 11th: Adam Patterson

Adam Patterson is 17 years old

"Aphrodite" is a ceramic work which tests Adam's skill - the piece is very good of itself, BUT...

Anyone who knows Greek mythology would be aware that Aphrodite is not really an accurate name for defining motherly love, PLUS it was Zeus who gave birth to Pallas Athene only after Hephaestos struck Zeus’ swollen head with an axe. This sculpture is more in line with this story, rather than a representation of the Goddess Of Love? I am not saying the sculpture is bad, rather its naming needed more thought if you are using a specific genre…

5 Responses

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  1. Excuse me , this sculpture has nothing to do with the aforementioned story.Please speak to the creator before criticizing his choice of name. Thank you 🙂 Have a wonderful evening.

  2. hmmm maybe if u actually did some research and asked the artist u would realize this piece is much more than what u are taking it for and in fact the name is perfect for the piece. so try again or better yet just keep your mouth shut on things you know nothing about.

  3. Considering I did ask Adam and did state my POV which is my democratic right, I do not see it as myself who needs to shut my mouth – ignorance revels in wasted vitriol, go sit in the corner dearie, and learn your Mythology properly okay? Thanks for stopping by and showing all your stupidity! My comments stand unchanged…

  4. Nicer way of expressing dissent but ask first, I did express my concern to Adam directly and I am NOT changing my POV, okay? Thank you too – like the group portrait? If you are getting into Art, Cherisse, one thing you need to do and fast… Get a very thick armour, since not everyone is going to agree on nor love all of what you do, the armour is also known as MATURITY

  5. For the sake of clarification, here is an excerpt from my personal explanatory notes on the piece, “Aphrodite”:

    “The piece, entitled “Aprodite”, is not a depiction of the capricious Goddess of Greek Lore, but a representation of womanhood through the use of symbols associated with the Goddess, i.e. femininity and fertility, while Aphrodite serving merely as a synechdochic reference. The original title of the sculpture, being “Motion”, serving as a description of the commentary on the progression of female strife and evolution throughout history, was discarded and replaced with “Aphrodite” because of the empowering female connotations associated with the lustful Goddess…”

    – It continues on to explain that my art is never really intended to depict a solid concept, but to transform the conceptual to a defined image. As misleading as the title may be, with proper scouting of information, such as an interview opposed to a two-minute conversation on the subject, the piece’s true meanings may have been understood.

    My sculpture, “Aphrodite”, has always stood as a symbol of womanhood, not the Goddess. The title is an appropriate conceptual endowment, as it refers to a Goddess, i.e. a powerful eternal female animus. I apologize for your misinterpretation, but to be fair, I didn’t go in depth enough for a valid critique to be in order.

    For the sake of both our esteems, I’d appreciate if you didn’t respond to this in the same fashion in which you addressed my friends. As outraged and as forward as they were, their opinions didn’t deserve to be trampled by harsh ad hominem criticisms, based on age and maturation. I’ve attempted to respond to this critique as cordially as I’ve allowed myself, therefore, I expect you to respond in an equally cordial manner, lest your reputation as a “reporter” be tarnished with self-given character defamation.


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