SINGER/ACTIVIST HARRY BELAFONTE’s DAUGHTER COMING FOR BARBADIAN FILM FESTIVAL #belafonte #caribbeantales #barbados #cinema #hbola #movies

Gina Belafonte – the youngest daughter of world-famous American singer, actor and civil rights activist Harry Belafonte – will attend next week’s Caribbean premiere of “Sing Your Song” in Barbados; the highly regarded bio-documentary of her father’s life.

#actvism #caribbeantales #barbados #film #belafonte #beetlejuice

“Sing Your Song,” opened the Sundance Film Festival in Utah, and according to, was launched with the emotional charge of a political rally combined with the enthusiasm of a revival meeting.” Subsequently HBO picked up the US television rights. Speaking about the film recently, Harry Belafonte, credited the team that worked on it for their sterling contributions. “I’ve had the extreme fortune to met the man, ("Sing Your Song" producer) Michael Cohl…who funded the making of "Sing Your Song".

The film is the highlight of the Opening Night of CaribbeanTales Film Festival 2012 which is the third annual edition of the foremost gathering of regional film professionals, including directors and producers. The 7 p.m. screening takes place on Wednesday April 11 at Frank Collymore Hall and the public is invited to attend. Tickets are available online ( and at select locations for Bds$35 and Bds$40 at the door.

An American TV and film actress in her own right, Gina has worked with her father as coach and produced more than six films. She helped found “The Gathering For Justice”, an inter-generational, intercultural non-profit organisation working to reintroduce non-violence to stop child incarceration. Also attending the premiere will be Susanne Rostock who enjoyed her directorial debut on “Sing Your Song”.

“I was thrilled to be given the opportunity to help tell this remarkable story. I felt the role Harry Belafonte played in the many struggles for human rights throughout 20th/21st century history could have a profound, inspiring effect on the viewer – especially the young,” said Rostock, urging the public to come and see this feature on one of the Caribbean’s legendary sons.

Asked about his expression of guilt or anxiety in the film over the worsening of some of society’s problems which he fought as an activist, Belafonte – who is of Jamaican descent – conceded that both his generation and their offspring are to blame.

“When I spoke with Nelson (Mandela) on this very subject, his response was that it would behoove us not to become complacent, not to begin to find justification that absolves us of a sense of responsibility for the consequences we are experiencing. Somewhere, we made a mistake. Somewhere, we were not endowed with enough vision and foresight to do things. Somewhere in the pass-off (to our children), we didn’t sacrifice enough to make sure that those who were receiving the baton received it properly,” he reasoned.

That, however, does not dismiss the glory of turning around, picking it up, and going on with the race…There is more race to be run. There are more people to be engaged.”

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