British High Commission’s Department for International Development Caribbean announces new support for region

At the Forum Minister Duncan stated that “The potential of the Economic Partnership Agreement (EPA) is not yet being fully realised. We are keen to work with the region and the EU to secure the benefits of the Agreement and open the gateway to trade with the UK and Europe. Boosting growth and creating jobs is a shared priority.”

At the 7th UK Caribbean Forum held in Grenada from 20 – 22nd January 2011, Alan Duncan, the UK’s Minister for the Department for International Development (DFID), announced the following:

  • £4.9 million in new support through the Caribbean Community Climate Change Centre (CCCCC) to help the region cope with the impacts of climate change through its Implementation Plan for Development Resilient to Climate Change. UK support will help develop a monitoring and evaluation framework for the Plan, strengthen the region’s voice in international negotiations and help countries to reduce the impact of climate change by improving risk analysis and providing evidence of what works and what doesn’t. DFID will also support the management of 15 marine protected areas.
  • £1.4 million in new support for the IDEAS contest. DFID support will help to develop innovative renewable energy and energy efficiency projects that are good for the environment and make good economic sense in a region where energy prices are amongst the highest in the world.
  • £500,000 in new support to the Caribbean Export Development Agency (CEDA) to support Break Point – an innovative programme designed to identify emerging entrepreneurs and businesses in the Caribbean. DFID funds will also help Caribbean Export organise an Investment Forum in London, held alongside the Olympics this summer. The investment Forum will provide a platform for the Break Point winners to present their business ideas to the world, alongside those of more established Caribbean businesses.

The UK has also committed £10m to COMPETE Caribbean and the first round of grant awardees were also announced at this Forum. These include projects in manufacturing, tourism and even a chocolate factory. These projects will boost exports and create badly needed jobs.

One Response

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  1. Thank you most kindly Sir. When time allows, please direct your gaze to another small item , deserving of equal, if not greater need and urgent action. The APD. If this is not removed or seriously reduced, all your former colonies will pass laws, which require visiting Brits, to eat noting but bangers and mash for every meal during their stay in the Caribbean, and to pray to Beijing five times a day. Yes, unlike the occupants of numbers 10 and 11 Downing street, we Caribbean folks do not inflict serious, deliberate, debilitating injury on friendly nations. So although our Brit visitors will be required to bow down to Downing Street five times daily, we will of the goodness of our hearts, allow them to do so wherever they happen to be at such appointed times, and in whatever garb they might happen to be wearing: like , at the beach, playing polo, of just kicking back at the beach with a rum punch in hand. And there will be no surtax of L250.00 to re-enter Virgin Atlantic or BA, and wend their way happily home.


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