Accommodating Disabled spectators at the London Olympic and Paralympic Games

The London Organising Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games (LOCOG) announced on 30 March 2011 a wide range of Olympic Games ticket products to ensure that disabled spectators have a great Games-time experience. Overseas spectators should contact their National Olympic Committee or Authorised Ticket Reseller for further information about how to apply for these ticket products. Follow the link for details of NOCs/ATRs in your country:

The products meet a variety of accessibility requirements, and tickets will be available at every venue, in every session and across all price categories.

The first footbridge under construction crosses the River Lea beside the Olympic Stadium.

When applying for a ticket, spectators will be able to indicate an additional accessibility requirement, such as a seat down fewest steps for those who find stairs difficult; a seat on the end of a row for those who need extra room; a seat with a direct view of video information screens for people who are Deaf or hearing impaired; or a seat close to the action for visually impaired people.

Spectators who need a wheelchair space will be able to apply for one. If their application is successful, they will be provided with a space wide enough to accommodate a wheelchair or mobility scooter and an adjacent seat for a companion.

To ensure everyone has an enjoyable Games-time experience, London 2012 will provide a number of additional services for disabled people. These will include free blue badge parking spaces at all venues; accessible shuttle bus options; a free mobility service to loan out manual wheelchairs and scooters; facilities for assistance dogs, audio description, induction loops; an adult changing toilet which includes a hoist at all venues; and spectator information in accessible formats.

Seb Coe, Chair of LOCOG, said: ‘Our aim has always been to provide a wide range of services and ticket products for disabled people tailored to their needs, rather than a ‘one size fits all’ approach. We want to ensure that disabled spectators have as great a Games experience as anyone else and we are committed to providing services and facilities that meet all accessibility requirements.’

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