Psychological warfare (Hallowe’en/Celtic New Year): How ghosts, superstitions, and vampires have been deployed as weapons

"Wolf's Hour" actually made a lot of mainstream lists and awards much to mr McCammon's surprise - he went on to write the seminal "Boy's Life" which while Fantasy was also 'Coming Of Age' from childhood into Teen/Adulthood

Robert R. McCammon’s “Wolf’s Hour” examined how a werewolf was used to defeat Nazi Europe; an episode of True Blood had a flashback from Eric Northman when he and his maker Godric were tracking a “Werwolf Projekt” at the end of Berlin about 1945… So there’s more than one instance where the Allies used Fear to defeat the Axis… What about reality? Have there been extraordinary means used to achieve victory? Well, apart from Indiana Jones discovery of Hitler’s fascination with the Occult (which paralleled reality), there were quite a few situations where ordinary men did their best to appear not so ordinary – as the sci-fi blog IO9 reveals;-

In World War II, US forces exploited the Nazi’s predilection to put stock in superstitions and the occult. The Rand Corporation’s 1950 memorandumThe Exploitation of Superstitions for Purposes of Psychological Warfaredetails how pseudoscience connoisseur Joseph Goebbels counteracted Allied attempts to strike fear into the superstitious strata of the German population:

Anyone recall Mott's Vampiric Speed Texting? Perhaps if he was still alive, he could have infiltrated the TV version of Russell Edgington's ring...

Another curious incident noted in the Rand document occurs in Italy, where British military created a giant manikin to scare rural residents. A large, shambling creature was assembled to freak out superstitious locals…

Like Sundance & Butch, there's Godric & Eric - perhaps Charlaine Harris and Alan Ball can do a Webisode outside of both TV & Book Series of Tru-Blood?

Europe is not the only place where folks still dread those which go BUMP in the nite, let’s got further afield;-

…{USA’s} Major General Edward G. Lansdale spearheaded {a} rumor that an asuwang was loose in the Philippines. In Filipino mythology, the asuwang is a winged, vampiric witch that has a hankering for unborn fetuses. The US military was battling Communist Huk rebels and concocted possibly the only covert operation in human history to stage a vampiric attack. Lansdale recalls:

To the superstitious, the Huk battleground was a haunted place filled with ghosts and eerie creatures. A combat psy-war squad was brought in. It planted stories among town residents of an Asuang living on the hill where the Huks were based. Two nights later, after giving the stories time to make their way up to the hill camp, the psywar squad set up an ambush along the trail used by the Huks […] When a Huk patrol came along the trail, the ambushers silently snatched the last man of the patrol, their move unseen in the dark night.

They punctured his neck with two holes, vampire-fashion, held the body up by the heels, drained it of blood, and put the corpse back on the trail. When the Huks returned to look for the missing man and found their bloodless comrade, every member of the patrol believed that the Asuang had got him and that one of them would be next if they remained on that hill. When daylight came, the whole Huk squadron moved out of the vicinity.

For some reason, this Filipino vampiric creature reminds me of the Caribbean's "Succoyant" all that's missing is the skin & salt to defeat...

But the same IO9 item pointed out such esoteric techniques could backfire at least expected moments – like when the USA tried a similar tactic with the Viet Cong in the 70’s, but the guerrilla fighters were so scared of what seemed like ghosts talking they actually redoubled their efforts to drive off the ethereal noises which were really recordings played back at different speeds.

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