Americans try Barbadian Cuisine: Eat “Codfish-Balls” alias, Fishcakes – Cock’s is no poky li’l greasy spoon

This is not the first time we heard of this Bajan restaurant in the USA, but since last we examined Cock’s (Yes, that’s the name of the place) it has gotten another review and more comprehensively – a group of Americans in New York with open minds and wider appetites…

The guy even had a Leadpipe for dessert! Cock’s Restaurant (no website) 806 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn Subway: Nostrand Ave. station (3 train)

The guy even had a Leadpipe for dessert! Cock’s Restaurant (no website) 806 Nostrand Ave., Brooklyn Subway: Nostrand Ave. station (3 train)

My law student girlfriend, who usually doesn’t get out much, joined us, along with a Grenadian classmate of hers, who had lots of interesting insights into Caribbean cuisine. We were also accompanied by the usual beefy Puerto Rican and a random white guy from Nebraska. I like all of these people because they’re willing to eat pretty much anything, including cow hooves and blood sausage–which happen to form a combo delicacy calledpuddin’ & souse” in Barbados.

Cock’s is an extremely informal little place that does most of its business as takeout. There are only three tables, and we monopolized two of them for pretty much the entire evening. Elaine, the friendly Bajan owner of Cock’s, very generously spent a large part of the night talking to us about her food and her country, and we ended up staying in the restaurant from 7:00 until Elaine locked the doors at 11:00.

Good ol' Bajan Cou-Cou in New York! About "United Nations of Food" - {This guy is} trying to eat (reasonably authentic) food from every country in the world without leaving NYC. This means eating meals from about 175 different nationalities...

Good ol' Bajan Cou-Cou in New York! About "United Nations of Food" - {This guy is} trying to eat (reasonably authentic) food from every country in the world without leaving NYC. This means eating meals from about 175 different nationalities...

It is fun to see how someone else looks at what we take for granted, it reminds me of when I first came to Barbados at the age of 9 (I am Trans-Caribbean okay? Bajan dad and Vincy mum, hatched in TT) and one of the first things I learned was that sandwiches get called ‘a cutter‘ and the word for bottom was ‘pooch‘ (In the USA that’s a dog) – and for a long time all everyone would say to me is NEVER let anyone know I watched a Cartoon called “The Adventures of Gumby & Pokey” nor do I call jail ‘pokey‘ either! Now we still get “Hokey-Pokey” out of new Zealand from Tip Top ice cream

Anyhow, they get fishcakes and see what they call them;-

…the meal accidentally turned into a three-course affair. We started with codfish balls, which were peppery little friend balls of dough with saltcod. A little bit intense from a grease perspective, but really tasty. I didn’t think to ask Elaine about the spices involved, but it seemed to have a similar magic to the Jamaican stew peas—perhaps there’s such a thing asBajan pepper”? We washed the codfish balls down with ginger beer and the aforementioned puddin’ and souse; it’s safe to say that it’s an acquired taste if you aren’t a habitual hoof-eater.

For our main courses, we ordered three familiar items: chicken roti, stew chicken, and curry goat…

I did not know curry goat was Bajan? Maybe because it’s not curried goat it stops being Jamaican? Well, the reviewer obviously felt Cock’s had something to crow about…

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