On October 16th 2009 Damon Corrie was on his way back down a mountain in the Pakaraima range in Guyana with adopted Lokono-Arawak son Marlon (20), and three other tribal friends (Sado 24, Carlson 17, and Mariscad 13) – when the group stumbled out of the jungle covered hills and walked right into a very amazing place; in Corrie’s own words:

The first image that came to my mind was of Mayan ruins taken over by the jungles of Central America, this place looked as though huge granite boulders that had once fitted neatly together – had been subjected to a violent upheaval (whether seismic or volcanic) that had created the resulting appearance we all saw. I am no Archaeologist and cannot say for sure, but it appears to me that a tribe of long extinct ancient Amerindian stone masons at the very least – utilized and improvised a naturally created site.”

I was later told my elders of the current tribe to inhabit the area (having conquered and expelled the previous resident tribes 200-400 years ago) – that I was the first person outside of a handful of male hunters from their tribe to ever lay eyes or set foot in this ancient site; and I consider it my supreme good fortune to be in the sole position to share this exciting news with the wider world.

I have taken as much photographic and DVD evidence as I can as proof – to counter the inevitable ‘naysayers‘ who will come out of the proverbial woodwork as the news spreads.

The evidence includes;- Stone platters, stone bowls, pottery of a style not noted before among Guyana tribes and bearing a resemblance to Incan pottery (possible evidence of a great pre-Colombian pan South American inter-tribal trade network), stone fishtrap/foot bridges over rivers, one metre high stone obelisks with petroglyphs, mural sized petroglyphs on stone that resemble ‘maps‘, and hundreds of smaller stone petroglyphs in various places, as well as burial mounds, burial pots placed in caves, animal heads carved out of stone and clubs of stone – several with a bear motif …although no bears ever existed in Guyana as far as I am aware – though there is the Spectacled bear in the Andes (Tremarctos ornatus).

Over the past decade that I have spent approximately over US$10,000 of my own funds financing various expeditions to gather evidence of this intriguing unsolved mystery, and seeing unique stone and clay artifacts over an area of approximately 200 sq. miles in the Pakaraima Mountains of Guyana in the process; that what this all points to is a sophisticated and as yet unidentified pre-Colombian ancient Amerindian culture that was quite unique in north east South America – indeed perhaps in all of Amazonia!

Purely on my own I have decided to name this ancient culture ‘The Pakaraimans‘ – after the area of their former habitation.

On one final note, I would just like to ask that the media be ‘politically correct‘ by saying that I was the first person born outside of the present day tribe inhabiting the area – to discover the westernmost sacred site (as far as we know) and try to coalesce all the data into the ‘lost tribe‘ theory of mine – but I am certainly NOT the first person ever to discover the evidence they left behind, some of my tribal friends have been to the site previously; and others have also collected ancient artifacts all over these mountains many years before I came along and became obsessed with it all.

Yours sincerely,

Damon Gerard Corrie

Damon Corrie is a 36 year old Barbadian by birth of paternal Trinidadian and maternal Guyanese Arawak descent, a registered observer at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII), member of the Indigenous Caucus at the Organization of American States (OAS), and member of the Centre for Fortean Zoology (CFZ) of the United Kingdom – who’s Zoological Director Richard Freeman describes Damon as a “real-life Professor Challenger“.

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  1. Great Damon you always cared about our ancesters and how they were treated good luck to you


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