Eagle Clan heir to the Hereditary Chieftaincy tops reservation in 2009 CXC Maths results

Hatuey Corrie was born on St. Cuthbert’s Mission/Pakuri Arawak Territory, region 4 Guyana; on September 17th 1993 – the first child of young parents Damon Corrie and Shirling Corrie (nee Simon).

Father Damon is a well known International Indigenous Rights activist, autodidact journalist and author of 6 books, a member of the Indigenous Caucus of the Organization of American States (OAS) since 2000, and has been officially registered at the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues since 2008 (UNPFII).

Father Damon was born in Barbados of maternal Guyanese Lokono-Arawak ancestry, and mother Shirling is a local Arawak girl who herself was born on the 240 square mile semi-autonomous Amerindian reservation 60 miles up the Mahaica river.

Hatuey completed his primary education at the private St. Angela’s Catholic School, and on September 2nd 2009 entered fifth form at the Christ Church Foundation School – both in Barbados.

15 year-old Hatuey was considered proficient enough in Mathematics while in fourth form by his teacher at CCFS Mr. Gibbs – to sit the CXC mathematics exam one year ahead of his fellow classmates – who customarily sit this exam in 5th form (this current school year).

Hatuey also credits his achievement to his private lessons maths teacher Mr. Dominic of the St. Ursula’s private Catholic Secondary School, and his grandfather Geddes Corrie – who himself as a lad of 15 in Trinidad passed his 6 University of Cambridge Senior School Certificate exams (including Mathematics) – all with B grades.

Grandpa Corrie went on to become a Telecommunications Engineer with the UK based Cable & Wireless Limited; retiring from that position in Barbados in 1985 after 39 years of service.

Coincidentally, father Damon also received grade II’s in his CXC examination results, but after spending 3 years at the Christ Church Foundation School, 1 year at the Presentation College Boys private Catholic Secondary School, 1 year at the private Anglican Codrington High School, and 1 term at the Barbados O’Level Institute – Damon decided he could stay at home and educate himself with his CXC books, he then paid fees to sit his CXC examinations as a ‘private candidate‘ and only showed up to join other students in school to sit his exams on the days in question.

Hatuey has 3 other siblings, brother Tecumseh Shawandase (13 years) is at Combermere Secondary School in Barbados, sister Sabantho Aderi (10 years) is at St. Angela’s, and sister Laliwa Hadali (2 years) is on the St. Cuthbert’s Mision/Pakuri Arawak Territory in Guyana with their mother and the rest of the tribe.

Of the 2009 CXC results in Mathematics for the students on St. Cuthberts – Hatuey has achieved the highest score for any child born there.

Hatuey is a fifth generation descendant of Amorotahe Haubariria – who was the last Hereditary Lokono-Arawak Chief of the Eagle Clan (Bariria Korobahado) in Guyana in the late 1800’s; and after completing his education he is determined to return to St. Cuthbert’s Mission/Pakuri Arawak Territory and dedicate his life to the development of his Lokono-Arawak people and the preservation and promotion of Lokono-Arawak culture & identity.

2 Responses

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  1. Ta'kahi Guaitiao (Greetings relative),
    I hope that all are well and in good spirit.
    What an honor for the love, respect for your community and for the love and dedication that your both your parents have given, in a traditional way. We are very proud of you Hautey and you love you. You honor your people, our ancestors and most important you honor yourself. Walk with honor, respect and love in your heart for parents, your people and the Lokono way of life, that is shown here. It is your blood and spirit
    May Creator and our ancestors be with you always.
    Jan Jan Katu (So Be It)
    Sending you blessings.
    With great love and Oma'bahari (Respect)
    Abuela Karaira
    Taino Boriken
    United Confederation of Taino

  2. Thank you for an interesting article -I wish this was featured in the daily newspapers. I feel cheated of the education I got at school over a decade ago. I learnt European History, Henry VII, Elizabeth and Mary…I learnt about the "peaceful Arawaks" and the "Cannibal Caribs"…I learnt that Africa began with slavery … I really wish I was taught about Africa before it was plundered by the slave trade…and more about the civilisations created byt he indigenous persons in the Caribbean…the fact that these tribes still exist – is their story being docmented and shared witht he rest of the region? This is what we should be proud of not BET, MTV and everything crap coming out of the USA…


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