Turning physics on its ear – Will OPEC get ugly if it’s true?

Thane Heins is nervous and hopeful. In four days the Ottawa-area native will travel to Boston where he’ll demonstrate an invention that appears … to operate as a perpetual motion machine.

The audience, esteemed Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor Markus Zahn, could either deflate Heins’ heretical claims or add momentum to a 20-year obsession. Zahn is a leading expert on electromagnetic and electronic systems. In a rare move for any reputable academic, he has agreed to give Heins’ creation an open-minded look rather than greet it with outright dismissal.

The invention … could moderately improve the efficiency of induction motors, used in everything from electric cars to ceiling fans. At best it means a way of tapping the mysterious powers of electromagnetic fields to produce more work out of less effort, seemingly creating electricity from nothing. Heins has modified his test so the effects observed are difficult to deny.

He holds a permanent magnet a few centimetres away from the driveshaft of an electric motor, and the magnetic field it creates causes the motor to accelerate. Contacted by phone a few hours after the test, Zahn is genuinely stumped ? and surprised. He said the magnet shouldn’t cause acceleration.

It’s an unusual phenomenon I wouldn’t have predicted in advance. But I saw it. It’s real. To my mind this is unexpected and new,” he [said]. “There are an infinite number of induction machines in people’s homes and everywhere around the world. If you could make them more efficient, cumulatively, it could make a big difference.”

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