Who is Waiting For Keith and and what is it all about? Some info from the Casting Call

If you recall the other day, a new Caribbean film to be done here was looking for a few good folk, it seems it’s Yao Ramesar of Sista God fame… Well “Waiting For Keith” is a more basic Caribbean premise than the supernatural essences of Sista God (I am not revealing all of the plot, if you like it see if you can be crew or cast when next Wayne Cezair via waitingforkeith@gmail.com is having another Casting Call).


The majority of the script consists of a dialogue between two persons, an elderly clean cut country resident, simply described as ?Old Man? and his son Fox, a ?weed? smoking rasta who comes to the country to visit the old man. The main supporting character, Tony, a farmer, makes an appearance during the course of the film to join in the conversation and to mediate the conflict between the father and son. One other character, Keith, is mentioned throughout the film but only appears in the final scene.

The old man of seventy-five years, is caught up in his everyday life, everyday concerns and tells anecdotes – small stories about simple occurrences in his and his neighbour?s lives, some tragic, some funny, some introspective, some foretelling. Interspersed between these stories are references to Keith or rather, the absence of Keith, who we can describe as a ?virtual? character. Keith is needed to rope the 2000 lb. bull that has stood proudly and defiantly in the field for the past six years. Today it has been sold and has to be moved from the field to the pen so it can be taken away by his new owner.

Keith is the only person who can even get close to the bull much less get a rope around it. He is also regarded as an information resource – the only one in the area who has a TV and who is entrusted to bring, or in any case, brings the news of the ?outside? world to the old man. It is by reference to Keith and the news he brings that the old man shows his knowledge and interpretation of the issues facing the ?outside? world. Every time Keith is mentioned, a story relating to Keith is told. Some of them are repetitions of news stories and the old man?s interpretation of these stories- others are descriptions of incidents in which Keith was involved. Almost all of these incidents are funny but at least one could be considered tragic.

These stories alternate with the old man either going about his everyday routines or sharing the local news with his son and neighbour, who give their own opinions about the stories that the old man tells them and who also have their stories to tell. The discussions often lead to very conflicting or controversial opinions being advanced due to the different viewpoints of the three men.

Fox is a very laid back rasta. Comes out to the country to visit the old man to trade stories and bring whatever the old man needs and can?t get easily. Always smoking a ?joint? much to the annoyance of his father who advises against smoking since its illegal. Fox sees the country as the only place he can smoke in peace and safety. He is the counterfoil to the old man and usually offers the contrasting viewpoint to his father?s opinions. Generally he holds a more ?modern? and more controversial view, usually influenced by his sense of social consciousness and his opinion of the world from the point of view of the small oppressed minorities being held back by the status quo and the idea of ?big brother? running rough shod over the less fortunate. His opinion of his father which starts out as being interfering and controlling changes to sympathetic and understanding as he realizes that his father only had good intentions in his often stubborn method of dealing with their differences.

The old man?s wife had died some years before and he remains alone without outside contact except for Keith and his son Fox and the occasional villager or neighbour. His only companions are his dogs. Things have become harder- the cost of basic necessities has gone up. Keith says its because of the wars overseas.

The old man can?t rationalize why something that happens so far away should have an impact on his isolated life. Much of life for him has not changed except for the cost of living going steadily up. As well, the local suppliers in the village – the shop, the bakery etc. have all long since closed- replaced by a gas station and grocery store, Now he has to rely on his son Fox to bring him the things he needs, but can?t get in the village. Very contemplative and verbose he never misses an opportunity to give his opinion on whatever subject happens to be the topic of conversation at the time and usually recounts a story of a similar nature from past experience to reinforce his opinion.

His relationship with his son Lennox (aka Fox) is strained. He sees Fox as a lazy, long-haired youth with little ambition who has abandoned him in his time of real need after his wife?s passing. Fox is however adamant that he wants to live his life on his own, away from his father?s constant badgering about his lifestyle. The old man, however, is fixed in his ways- stubborn to a fault- and continues to try to ?reform? his recalcitrant son.

Their opinions about most issues conflict, with Fox usually taking a more sympathetic view against his father?s hard line. Various topics are discussed, most relating to the devastating change in societal norms and behaviour and all seemingly related to the apparent mad rush to a violent conclusion of humanity?s tenure on earth. Different theories relating to humanity?s demise are proposed and considered: incurable diseases like AIDS; kidnapping, gang warfare or some other kind of personal attack; natural and man influenced disasters; acts of god or the advent of World War III.

As the problems facing the world are discussed, some solutions and alternatives are proposed by Fox which eventually convince his father that he is not as useless as he believes and his opinion of Fox gradually changes as he listens to his discussions of the problems facing society. He eventually begins to realize that the outside world is having a great influence on his own previously insulated life and that his destiny is being shaped by events outside his control.

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