American Mystery Author plans a trip to Barbados – based on one of his character’s nationalities (Follow-Up)

Here’s another sequel, so to speak; there is an American mystery writer who makes sure a bit of Barbados is always thrown in for good measure, Tim Smith, we decided to see if anything new is published by him and sent him a series of questions, this is what we detected –

  1. Is Nick Seven your only character, or are there other books done or yet to come with spin-off or new characters/protagonists?
    Nick Seven is my main character focus at the moment, although there are a couple of support characters in my latest book, “The Vendetta Factor,” who could carry their own storyline. As a change of pace I recently finished writing a romantic comedy told from the man’s point of view, and the protagonist, Sam Diamond, is as far removed from Nick Seven as you can get. It might be fun to give Felicia, Nick’s Barbadian girlfriend, her own adventure and see what happens.

  2. Will you have more of the Caribbean involved in your upcoming novels?
    I’m always looking for new atmosphere and settings for my books, and would like to incorporate more of the Caribbean influence. Although part of my next thriller takes place in Lisbon, Portugal, I see a trip to Barbados in my future.

  3. Was this inspired by Tropical Heat / Sweating Bullets? Click on the link to understand my line of questioning… The main character in a Hispanic tropical locale was Nick Slaughter, the main theme was a reggae tune called “ Any way the wind blows
    I had never heard of “Tropical Heat” or Nick Slaughter, but after reading about it, it sounds like the type of TV series I’d enjoy. My books were inspired more by old Bogart movies and Phillip Marlowe mysteries, with a dash of Peter Gunn and Dirty Harry thrown in for fun. When I’m writing one of these stories, I keep hearing a retro cool jazz score, something circa late fifties, early sixties.

  4. How many awards has the series earned? Have you ever won an Edgar?

    My first book, “Memories Die Last,” won the 2004 Allbooks Reviews Editor’s Choice Award for fiction, and was named Best Mystery Novel of 2005 by The follow-up, “Never Trust Your Dreams,” was also named Best Mystery Novel of 2006 by I’ve never won an Edgar, but I’m still young.

  5. Was this a vanity publication at first or was it using an independent media house? What do you recommend and how do you go about it?

    All of my books were published by Publishamerica, a traditional royalty-paying publisher. I did not self-publish or go the vanity press route. For anyone considering publication, I’d suggest searching the internet for small press publishers that would best serve their subject matter or genre. Contrary to popular belief, you don?t need a literary agent to land a contract with a traditional publisher.

  6. Do the awards help market your books? Have you sold most of your books off the shelf or online? How many copies moved so far?
    I don’t think the awards hurt in the marketing of a book, and they certainly look nice in your press kit. Reviews – especially good ones – are also a plus, but I’m not sure how much impact they have on sales. Most of my books have been sold online, although I’ve had good success getting traditional bookstores to stock them and have me in for signings. As to how many copies have moved so far, if someone figures out the magic formula to accurately track sales, please share it with me.

  7. Is there an endless supply of Nick Seven or is his last name how many books, like H. Potter, etc.

    As long as my overactive imagination still works, I see a long line of Nick Seven thrillers. This character has been so well-received and has so many layers to his personality, it wouldn’t seem right to end his adventures anytime soon.

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