United States Embassy Hosting Film Festival for Black History Month

The African-American experience will be explored when the United States Embassy to Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean hosts a film festival to celebrate Black History Month.

The festival will be launched on Thursday, February 7th at the George Washington House in the Garrison Historic Area, St. Michael, with Journey to Freedom. The film traces the yearning for freedom from the times of the Atlantic slave trade through to the present day and modern human trafficking.

On Sunday, February 11th, the festival will move to the Grande Salle of the Central Bank for a screening of the award-winning documentary White Scripts and Black Supermen: Black Masculinities in American Comic Books. The documentary’s filmmaker Dr. Jonathan Gayles will be on hand for a personal question-and-answer session about the film.

On Sunday, February 11th, the festival will move to the Grande Salle of the Central Bank for a screening of the award-winning documentary White Scripts and Black Supermen: Black Masculinities in American Comic Books. The documentary’s filmmaker Dr. Jonathan Gayles will be on hand for a personal question-and-answer session about the film.

The festival returns to George Washington House on Valentine’s Day – Thursday, February 14th with the appropriately romantic 1990s comedy, Love Jones, featuring Larenz Tate and Nia Long.

With general elections falling the next Thursday, February 21st, the film festival resumes on the following day, Friday, February 22nd at the George Washington House. Classic film lovers will be in for a treat with a screening of the original, Sidney Poitier-starring version of A Raisin in the Sun, Lorraine Hansberry’s classic film which seeks to answer what happens to a dream deferred.

The festival will close on February 28th with an outdoor screening at the George Washington House of the Golden Globe-nominated film The Great Debaters. Directed by and starring Denzel Washington, the film revolves around the true story of the efforts of a debate coach at the historically black Wiley College to place his team on equal footing with whites in the American South in the 1930s.

All events are free and open to the public.

Stay in touch with the conversation, subscribe to the RSS feed for comments on this post.

Comments

add a comment

Some HTML is OK

or, reply to this post via trackback.